Wrist Surgery. I won’t be able to type for 6 weeks…definitely going to try the Dragon Speech-to-text software! Read on to see how it could be a great proofreading/editing tool for everyone. Wish me luck!

blackdragonI was in a little car mishap about 14 months ago. Tendon and ligaments were torn in my right wrist. The doctor and I have tried everything to keep me typing…with no success. Surgery is tomorrow. 6 weeks in a cast from my fingertips to almost up to my shoulder. What’s a girl to do who’s a writer/editor/publisher/book reviewer? Maybe lots of time to read! Type reviews one-handed? I CAN DO THAT!

I purchased the DRAGON software/speech-to-text last year when I originally hurt my wrist, but since I could still type, albeit painfully, I never set it up completely. NOW I HAVE TO DO IT!

I’ll try to update with reports on the DRAGON for those of you out there interested in it. I actually think it could be a good editing tool. As I written about many times before…you can’t edit or proofread your own copy, no matter how good you are at spotting errors. If you wrote it…if you typed it…it’s engrained in your gray matter. When you try to proofread or edit, your brain automatically reads over the typos and errors. Your physical organ, the brain, sees what it thinks is there, not necessarily what is there.

WITH THE DRAGON, you’ll be using a completely different set of senses. You’ll be speaking. The more senses you can use to learn something or remember something (seeing, hearing, touching through typing), the more thoroughly you retain the information, which can be great if you want to memorize something, but not so much if you want to proofread or edit like it’s the first time you’ve seen the material. So, that said, tell stories or relate nonfiction to your heart’s content to get your initial ideas on screen with DRAGON. Then, look at it for your initial edit and rewrite. It will be fresh, new, and not all bogged up in your brain. It may look terrible for the first go-round, but that in itself can inspire your brain to see where it needs work.

I’ve learned much of this through trial-and-error, but just for those who need credentials, I have a master’s equivalent in Writing/Editing from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Graduate School (back when I went, it wasn’t counted as college credit as it is now) with a minor in Psychology and accredited ACPH–Advanced Clinical Psychological Hypnotherapist. Believe it or not, my hypnotherapy classes from the National Guild of Hypnotists is where I learned most of the brain retention/learning information. I specialized in ADHD teenagers. Please refer back to some of my previous blogs on editing and proofreading if this fascinating subject interests you.

I hope to stay in touch with everyone, and thank you all for checking out my blog.

DEBORAH A. BOWMAN