Annie’s Story, Blessed With A Gift Review

Many thanks to this unknown reader who praised my research, story, and mission concerning Annie from the mid-1600s Colonial America. The points mentioned in the review are exactly what I was trying to point out … in history, in the treatment between different ethnicities and religions, and the abuse, bullying, and demonic fear of children, mere babies, with birth defects in a land where people came to escape the tyranny of Europe. My hypothesis is that this is still going on in the world today, even in the United States of America.

Many thanks to this reader from the author … Deborah A. Bowman

REVIEW:
on June 25, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition
Life in America circa 1,600 CE can’t have been easy, not with the English intent on stamping their domination and with the Puritans extolling so called Christian virtues to the extreme. As the saying goes: the more things change, the more it remains the same.
Annie’s Story provides a unique insider’s look into the world of newly emigrated people, the Scots, to a free land where they could safely continue worshipping their faith—Catholicism. For Annie, born into a world where one’s physical differences and abilities were considered the child of the devil, it was life threatening.
Annie was raised by her grandmother, a renowned Scottish healer, after her parents died from the plague. This story highlights the hardships endured by immigrants in a world vastly different to their own, who contend with harshness of the land, weather and hiding their beliefs from their neighbours—the Puritans.
Annie was a dwarf and a healer, born in the mid-17th century in Colonial America. Her family left Scotland to avoid the harsh and imperial rule of the English King Charles II, migrated to Massachusetts Bay area, not far from a Puritan settlement. Her grandmother, taught Annie the art and skills of ‘pagan’ medicine after witnessing her miraculously heal a man who almost died.
Annie’s grandmother, her best friend Janey, her parents and the Scottish community protect and shield Annie from outsiders, who don’t understand her physical and mental disabilities. The young girl heals a boy from the Puritan township, which they later become friends and then fall in love.
One of the subjects I am not overly familiar with is American history. The Civil War was perhaps its greatest exponents, as was Abraham Lincoln, and so when I started reading this book, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I read historical fiction, but tend to go for books that predate Christianity.
What intrigued and drew me to the story was that it was premised on a past-life regression, in this case, the author’s. Bowman prefaces the book with background information that she underwent an “age” regression, and in follow up sessions, learnt she lived in another time and went by the name of Annie. The book has facts interwoven within the story, about Annie, the period and the way people who were different were treated. It is evident a great deal of research has gone into the story, describing what life was like during Colonial America for migrants, the Indians and how the Puritans lived.
The use of Scottish phrases and terms is great and it remains true to the characters, but I would have preferred a glossary at the end of the book rather than the explanation within the narrative.
For readers who know little about America’s early history, Annie’s Story is a good introduction to life during a period of unrest in Colonial America. For those who know a lot more, you will enjoy the various historical elements that feature in this story.

Annie Postcard Cover

 

A Writer is Only As Good as Their Editor…

Editing and proofreading is a professional service that every writer needs … even if you’re an editor yourself. Trying to correct and find problems in your own work is limiting. You need that second opinion, that second pair of eyes to see what your mind might skip right over because the mind convinces the eye to see what it expects to see, whether that’s what in print/on-screen or not. Words and images in print or online are forever, and they can and will come back to haunt you!

Typos, autocorrect, which can cause as many problems as it corrects by inserting an incorrect word just as often as the right one, especially synonyms like “rode” and “road”, aren’t the only concern. Awkward phraseology, verb tenses (an author’s nightmare–we think in present tense, but usually write in third-person past) can cause your reader to stop reading and move onto something else. There’s so much online to read!

Some genres and authors, both fiction and nonfiction, are using first-person present tense, which was a complete no-no in the writing industry when I was educated and have worked for many years. But every decade or so, experimental “new” ideas surface that are supposed to be unique and alternative. Have you ever heard, “There’s nothing new under the sun”? It’s a very true statement. It’s all been tried before and much has not stood the test of time.

We try to remain current and far-reaching for the future as writers, but it seems like the rules change all the time. There is this lackadaisical attitude that anything goes and typos, inaccuracies … well, they’re just to be accepted as “that’s the way it is–overlook them, and that’s not a misspelling, I’ve just created a new word!”

Styles change and words emerge, but as an avid reader, author, and editor I constantly stay in touch with what’s new in the writing industry to keep my clients on-track and in-sync with evolving trends. Yet, nowhere are typos, misused grammar, misspellings, and unclear syntax an attractive addition to a written piece.

The writing industry is more competitive and overcrowded than ever and that is going to keep escalating with technology. Write about what you care about, and just as importantly, care about the quality of what you write.

Best Wishes on Your Writing Endeavors!

–Deborah A. Bowman

http://www.clasidconsultantspublishing.com

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Write Every Day!

I’m trying to keep a promise

I think it will be harmless

To write something every day

To help someone on their way

To express what they feel

Penning words to describe what’s real

Hiding in the depths of our hearts

Words bring people together

Don’t let them tear us apart

Let words and feelings make us all better

Than we were at the start of each new day

Spreading gifts of creativity to everyone along our way

By Deborah A. Bowman

books and journals

 

 

 

August 2016 Special Edition of Clasid Consultants Publishing.com Newsletter, “Tricks, Tips, and Trends” eWomenNetwork 16th Annual International Conference and Business Expo

August 2016 Special Edition Newsletter

I love this soft watercolor that reveals my thoughts on editing…

I hope you always have smooth sailing working with your editor.

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Editors

I know that we are dreaded like the plague

And good writers all have been known to beg

For leniency, or “for just this once”

“Let me please have my participles in a bunch…”

It’s not rocket science or even a hunch

There really are tried and true rules

That adhere to the ‘Elements of Style’ clues

The bible, so to speak, on traditional editing

There is a right way and a wrong way for betting

On your words, finding your way

To take your thoughts and what you say

And put it in verse for another day

Or lovely prose with descriptive highlights

To tickle someone’s fancy and take them to new heights

In appreciating a well-edited dialogue

So your momentous scene isn’t bogged

Down, dribbling with boring facts

Or inconsequential IT hacks

Who’d rather be staring at patterns in binary

Who cares about your words? So secondary

To your science, technical, and professional views

If you can’t spill the beans on the most recent news

In your industry and do it justice

Your words are just tracks of scuffs

Showing you’ve been there

But you just didn’t care

About the right ways to present

Your latest new plot or business event

When you need to get the word out

By better means than just a shout

Editors can make it delectable–

Extract the extraneous, enhance the essential

Let your words speak for themselves

Letting your editor proofread and clarify

With accuracy and consistency

What you need to in-print upon the masses

For all time, literate passes

Through the online super highway

To express your desires, put out the fires

On the subject matter that you share with your peers

Releasing your fears, making the syntax clear

Yeah, an editor can do all that…

–© 2016 by Deborah A Bowman.

books and journals

Editing from yesteryear…

Annie is Done. What do I do now? I have no words … “Annie’s Story, Blessed With A Gift” (sequel in 2017)

Annie in custodyAnnie pictureHangingwitches

Annie's Final 6x9 Cover
A painting by my mother, an incredible artist (oil painting 18×24-inch on canvas). The forest is integral to Annie, who is based on a past-life regression. In essence, I am Annie!
Blessed With A Gift Cover
Annie lives in her own world. She talks to the animals and faeries. Quoted from ANNIE’S STORY: BLESSED WITH A GIFT–“Annie is an enigma.”